Guitar: Classic Guitar and Lute 7412
Chamber Music 7418
Concert 7413
Duo 7414
Ensemble 7417
Methods 7420
Recordings 7421
Solos/Studies 7416
Technique 7415
Guitar: Fingerpicking 7472
Blues 7474
Celtic 7482
Classics 7476
Contemporary 7477
Methods 7475
Other Styles 7480
Ragtime 7481
Traditional 7479
Guitar: Flamenco 7406
Methods 7407
Solos 7409
Technique 7408
Guitar: Latin 7512
Methods 7515
Solos/Ensembles 7514
Chording 7553
Methods/Study 7554
Other 7555
Solos 7556
Technique 7558
Tunebooks 7557
Banjo: Clawhammer 7337
Methods 7338
Solos 7339
Banjo:Bluegrass 7330
Accessories 7331
Chording 7332
Methods 7333
Other 7334
Solos/Tunebooks 7335
Technique 7336
Dulcimer: Hammered 7371
Chord/Theory 7374
Methods 7372
Solos 7373
Dulcimer: Mountain 7375
Chord Books 7378
Method/Study 7376
Solos 7377
Harmonica: Diatonic 7517
Blues Harp 7518
Methods 7520
Other 7521
Solos 7522
Method 7390
Other 7391
Solo 7392
Tunebooks 7393
Drum Set 7572
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Mallet 7574
Snare Drum 7573
Duos/Ensembles 7587
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Songbooks 7609
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Concertina 7311
Piano Accordion 7309
Autoharp and Chromaharp 7321
Methods 7322
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Bassoon 7352
Cello 7353
Classics 7355
Duet/Ensemble 7356
Methods 7357
Solos/Tunebooks 7358
Clarinet 7361
Duet/Ensemble 7363
Methods 7364
Solos 7365
Tunebooks 7366
Flute, Fife and Oboe 7395
Classics 7403
Duos/Ensemble 7401
Fife 7396
Methods 7397
Oboe 7404
Solo Collection 7399
Tunebooks 7402
French Horn 7405
Organ 7534
Other String Acoustic 7561
Bajo Sexto 7562
Bowed Psaltery 7567
Charango 7563
Guitarron 7564
Lute 7565
Oud 7566
Sitar 7568
Tres 7569
Vihuela 7570
String Bass 7592
Tinwhistle 7596
Instruments 7598
Methods/Study 7597
Tunebooks 7599
Trumpet & Bugle 7345
Duos/Ensembles 7350
Methods 7346
Solos 7348
Tunebooks 7351
Viola 7611
Violin 7612
Accessories 7613
Classics 7615
Duet/Ensemble 7616
Methods 7617
Solos/Tunebooks 7619

Glossary of Guitar Terms

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3/4-size guitar
A smaller than normal guitar with shorter strings and less space between frets.

A term referring to the height of the strings above the frets and fretboard.

altered and open tunings
The result of changing the tuning of one or more strings from standard EADGBE.

alternate picking
Picking in alternate directions (down-up-down-up).

A broken chord, usually played evenly low to high and back again.

The setting of an original or standard tune for a given solo instrument or group of instruments

barre chord
From the French term barré. The technique of placing the left hand index finger over two to six strings in the fingering of a chord. The great advantage of using barre chords is that they are "moveable shapes" that can be applied at practically any fret.

The act of pushing or pulling a string sideways across the a fret to raise the pitch of a note by a half to full tone or more. Used extensively in rock and blues playing as well as in jazz.

A mechanical barre that attaches to the neck of a guitar by means of a string, spring, elastic or nylon band, or a lever and thumbscrew arrangement. The capo can be used to raise the key of a song to suit a vocalist as well as to lower the action and shorten the string length.

Three or more notes sounded simultaneously.

chorus (of a tune)
Strictly speaking, the portion of a song lyric or melody that is repeated, often with other voices joining in. In jazz improvisation, however, "playing a chorus" would mean taking a turn improvising over the tune's chords progression.

closed voicing
The term "voicing" refers to the vertical arrangement of the notes of a given chord. "Closed voicing" places the member notes as close together as possible, no matter the inversion as opposed to "open voicing" which spreads the member notes of the chord at larger intervals.

A concave area generally in the upper right bout of a normal right-hand guitar that allows the player easier access to the high frets.

dropped-D tuning
The practice of lowering the sixth string (E) by a whole tone, one octave lower than the fourth string.

finger picks
Banjo-style picks that fingerstyle guitarists use when playing steel-string instruments.

Playing with the fingernails or fingertips with or without fingerpicks as opposed to playing with a flatpick.

A triangular or teardrop-shaped piece of nylon or plastic used to pluck or strum guitar strings. Flatpicks are available in a large variety of shapes, sizes, and thickness.

A small adjustable stool used to raise the height of the guitar.

A note sounded literally by "hammering" down with a left hand finger, often performed in conjunction with a note first plucked by the right hand on the same string.

Chime-like sounds achieved in two ways: 1) natural harmonics - by touching a string at any equidistant division of the string length (typically 5th, 7th, and 12th fret), directly above the fret with left hand, and striking hard with the right-hand fingers or pick near the bridge where there is more string resistance; or 2) artificial harmonics - touching a string with the index finger of the right hand twelve frets higher than any fretted note and plucking the string with either the thumb or third finger of the right hand.

The distance between two notes.

Structuring a chord with a note other than the root as the lowest note.

lead guitar
The part played by a guitar soloist in a rock band

To change keys within a piece of music

open voicing
A manner of chord construction in which the member notes are broadly separated. See closed voicing above.

pentatonic scale
A five-tone scale used often in rock.

Plucking or producing a sound on the guitar in general, either with the fingers or a flatpick. Sometimes refers to playing a single-note melody line.

p i m a
letters derived from the Spanish names for the fingers of the right hand: pulgar (thumb), indice (index), medio (middle), and anular (ring). Used to indicate fingering.

Another name for a flatpick.

A reference to placement of the left hand index finger at various frets.

power chord
A chord consisting of the first (root), fifth and eighth degree (octave) of the scale. Power chords are typically used in playing rock music.

The opposite of a hammer-on. Performed by plucking a note with a finger on a higher note and pulling parallel to the fret to sound a lower note on the same string.

rhythm guitar
Rhythmic strumming of chord backup for a lead player, singer, or ensemble.

The adjustment of the action of a guitar for optimal playing characteristics.

A plastic or glass tube placed over the third or fourth finger of the left hand and used to play "slide" or glissando effects in rock and blues and other forms of traditional music.

standard tuning
The guitar is generally tuned EADGBE low to high.

string winder
A swivel device with a handle with a fixture that fits over the tuning keys.

Performed with a pick or the fingers. Generally consists of brushing across 2-6 strings in a rhythmic up and down fashion appropriate to the tune being played.

tablature or tab
A system of writing music for fretted instruments whereby a number or letter appears on lines representing the strings, indicating the fret to be played.

To write a solo, note for note, off of a recording.

To change the key of a piece of music by a specific interval.

A technique performed with either a very rapid down-up movement of the pick or a pami plucking of the fingers.

A three-note chord.

An electronic tuning device.

To vibrate by slightly altering a pitch higher and lower.

The arrangement of the member notes of a chord, or placement of the melody or bass line within a harmonic progression.