Guitar Methods 7447
Fingerpicking 13449
Flamenco 13441
Flatpicking 13443
Latin 13452
Resonator 13445
Rock & Blues 13446
Slide/Bottleneck 13448
Guitar: Fingerpicking 7472
Method 13293
Solos 13294
Tunebook 13295
Guitar: Flatpicking 7422
Method 13366
Solos 13367
Tunebook 13368
Guitar: Latin 7512
Method 13402
Solo 13403
Guitar: Resonator 7432
Method 13400
Solos 13414
Tunebook 13415
Chord 13074
Method 13075
Solos 13076
Tunebooks 13077
Banjo: 5-String 7330
Chord 12923
Method 12924
Solos and Duets 12925
Tunebook 12926
Banjo: Clawhammer 7337
Chord 12936
Method 12937
Solos and Duets 12938
Tunebook 12939
Banjo:Tenor 7340
Chord 12941
Method 12942
Solos and Duets 12943
Tunebook 12944
Dulcimer: Hammered 7371
Chord 12994
Method 12995
Solos 12996
Dulcimer: Mountain 7375
Chord 12998
Method 12999
Solos 13000
Harmonica: Chromatic 7516
Blues Harp 13082
Method 13062
Solos 13063
Harmonica: Diatonic 7517
Blues Harp 7518
Method 13065
Solos 13066
Tunebooks 13067
Method 13124
Organ 13123
Solos 13125
Songbooks 13126
Method 13143
Solos 13144
Tunebooks 13145
Accordion 7308
Concertina 7311
Melodeon 12914
Piano Accordion 7309
Bassoon 7352
Cello 7353
Duet/Ensemble 12952
Method 12953
Solos 12954
Tunebook 12955
Clarinet 7361
Method 12957
Solos and Duets 12958
Tunebook 12959
Flute, Fife and Oboe 7395
Fife 13034
Method 13028
Oboe 13035
Solos 13029
Tunebook 13030
French Horn 7405
Other String Acoustic 7561
Bajo Sexto 7562
Bowed Psaltery 7567
Charango 7563
Guitarron 7564
Lute 7565
Oud 7566
Sitar 7568
Tres 7569
Vihuela 7570
String Bass 7592
Tin Whistle 7596
Duets 13162
Method 13163
Solos 13164
Tunebooks 13165
Viola 7611
Method 13195
Solos 13196
Tunebooks 13197
Violin 7612
Method 13201
Solos 13202
Tunebooks 13203

Glossary of Guitar Terms

Get the Glossary of Guitar Terms Wall Chart Here

Get the Glossary of Guitar Terms Book Here

Get the Glossary of Guitar Terms eBook Here

3/4-size guitar
A smaller than normal guitar with shorter strings and less space between frets.

A term referring to the height of the strings above the frets and fretboard.

altered and open tunings
The result of changing the tuning of one or more strings from standard EADGBE.

alternate picking
Picking in alternate directions (down-up-down-up).

A broken chord, usually played evenly low to high and back again.

The setting of an original or standard tune for a given solo instrument or group of instruments

barre chord
From the French term barré. The technique of placing the left hand index finger over two to six strings in the fingering of a chord. The great advantage of using barre chords is that they are "moveable shapes" that can be applied at practically any fret.

The act of pushing or pulling a string sideways across the a fret to raise the pitch of a note by a half to full tone or more. Used extensively in rock and blues playing as well as in jazz.

A mechanical barre that attaches to the neck of a guitar by means of a string, spring, elastic or nylon band, or a lever and thumbscrew arrangement. The capo can be used to raise the key of a song to suit a vocalist as well as to lower the action and shorten the string length.

Three or more notes sounded simultaneously.

chorus (of a tune)
Strictly speaking, the portion of a song lyric or melody that is repeated, often with other voices joining in. In jazz improvisation, however, "playing a chorus" would mean taking a turn improvising over the tune's chords progression.

closed voicing
The term "voicing" refers to the vertical arrangement of the notes of a given chord. "Closed voicing" places the member notes as close together as possible, no matter the inversion as opposed to "open voicing" which spreads the member notes of the chord at larger intervals.

A concave area generally in the upper right bout of a normal right-hand guitar that allows the player easier access to the high frets.

dropped-D tuning
The practice of lowering the sixth string (E) by a whole tone, one octave lower than the fourth string.

finger picks
Banjo-style picks that fingerstyle guitarists use when playing steel-string instruments.

Playing with the fingernails or fingertips with or without fingerpicks as opposed to playing with a flatpick.

A triangular or teardrop-shaped piece of nylon or plastic used to pluck or strum guitar strings. Flatpicks are available in a large variety of shapes, sizes, and thickness.

A small adjustable stool used to raise the height of the guitar.

A note sounded literally by "hammering" down with a left hand finger, often performed in conjunction with a note first plucked by the right hand on the same string.

Chime-like sounds achieved in two ways: 1) natural harmonics - by touching a string at any equidistant division of the string length (typically 5th, 7th, and 12th fret), directly above the fret with left hand, and striking hard with the right-hand fingers or pick near the bridge where there is more string resistance; or 2) artificial harmonics - touching a string with the index finger of the right hand twelve frets higher than any fretted note and plucking the string with either the thumb or third finger of the right hand.

The distance between two notes.

Structuring a chord with a note other than the root as the lowest note.

lead guitar
The part played by a guitar soloist in a rock band

To change keys within a piece of music

open voicing
A manner of chord construction in which the member notes are broadly separated. See closed voicing above.

pentatonic scale
A five-tone scale used often in rock.

Plucking or producing a sound on the guitar in general, either with the fingers or a flatpick. Sometimes refers to playing a single-note melody line.

p i m a
letters derived from the Spanish names for the fingers of the right hand: pulgar (thumb), indice (index), medio (middle), and anular (ring). Used to indicate fingering.

Another name for a flatpick.

A reference to placement of the left hand index finger at various frets.

power chord
A chord consisting of the first (root), fifth and eighth degree (octave) of the scale. Power chords are typically used in playing rock music.

The opposite of a hammer-on. Performed by plucking a note with a finger on a higher note and pulling parallel to the fret to sound a lower note on the same string.

rhythm guitar
Rhythmic strumming of chord backup for a lead player, singer, or ensemble.

The adjustment of the action of a guitar for optimal playing characteristics.

A plastic or glass tube placed over the third or fourth finger of the left hand and used to play "slide" or glissando effects in rock and blues and other forms of traditional music.

standard tuning
The guitar is generally tuned EADGBE low to high.

string winder
A swivel device with a handle with a fixture that fits over the tuning keys.

Performed with a pick or the fingers. Generally consists of brushing across 2-6 strings in a rhythmic up and down fashion appropriate to the tune being played.

tablature or tab
A system of writing music for fretted instruments whereby a number or letter appears on lines representing the strings, indicating the fret to be played.

To write a solo, note for note, off of a recording.

To change the key of a piece of music by a specific interval.

A technique performed with either a very rapid down-up movement of the pick or a pami plucking of the fingers.

A three-note chord.

An electronic tuning device.

To vibrate by slightly altering a pitch higher and lower.

The arrangement of the member notes of a chord, or placement of the melody or bass line within a harmonic progression.